Specials & Coupons

 

$49.99 Front End Wheel Alignment Special Coupon




$100 Rebate on Monroe Shocks and Struts









Nitrogen Conversion for Your Tires at Fisher's Tire & Service | Pensacola, FL



 Why is nitrogen better than air?
For tire inflation, there’s nothing better than nitrogen. Nitrogen provides better maintenance of tire pressure which maximizes...Fuel Economy, Handling, Safety & Reliability, Tire Life...and it’s better for the environment!
Nitrogen provides better maintenance of tire pressure. Because of its larger molecular size, nitrogen migrates through a tire three to four times slower than oxygen. A tire filled with “plain old air” will lose 1.5 PSI in less than a month; with nitrogen, this could take three months or longer.

 Can I put nitrogen in the tires I have now?
Yes. Nitrogen can be used in any tire you would fill with air, including the ones you already have on your vehicle. Nitrogen in your tires will enhance handling, improve fuel efficiency, extend tire life, help you protect the Earth, and most importantly, keep you safer on the road.
While nitrogen will help you maintain proper pressure, you should still check your tires on a regular basis and/or as recommended by the tire manufacturer.

 Is nitrogen safe?
78.1% of the air we breathe is nitrogen. Nitrogen is a non-flammable, inert gas which does not support combustion, as oxygen does. Nitrogen will not cause any increased chance of an explosion or fire during a vehicle accident. Therefore, nitrogen is actually much safer than compressed air for virtually any tire application - and one reason why it is used by commercial aircraft and professional race teams around the world.

 How much nitrogen should I put in my tires?
Simply inflate your tires with nitrogen to the vehicle manufacturer's recommended psi for air. There is no conversion factor necessary for filling tires with nitrogen vs air. GNI recommends inflation pressures as stated in the vehicle owner's manual or posted inside the driver's door of the vehicle, and maintaining this pressure in order to optimize your fuel economy, tire life, and vehicle handling.

 Do I fill my tires to the psi listed on my tires or on my vehicle? 

Tires should be filled to the vehicle manufacturer's cold pressure rating, not the psi rating on the tire. When vehicle manufacturers recommend their tire pressure for a vehicle, they strive to find the optimal pressure that will provide the best support (and ride) for the vehicle, as well as the longest tire life.

To accomplish this, they carefully take into account the weight and design of the vehicle, along with the range of pressure fluctuations a tire will be subjected to (due to changes in ambient temperature and temperature changes due to normal driving conditions).

The result is the recommended cold pressure for the vehicle, usually posted inside the driver's door or found in the operating manual.


 What if I get a flat or my tire has a leak?

Topping off nitrogen filled tires with compressed air is no problem. We recommend that you use nitrogen in your tires whenever possible, but if you run into a situation where you can’t get it, no problem. Go ahead and “top-off” your tires with air. Later, you can return to your dealer to have your tires purged of the air and refilled with nitrogen. 


 95% or 98% Nitrogen Purity- What’s Better For Me?

According to leading tire experts, it’s OK to use more than 93-95 percent nitrogen in your tires, but that’s all you need to gain all the benefits of nitrogen inflation.


 What’s the best process for adding nitrogen to my tires?

The most common method used to fill tires with nitrogen is to first purge the tire of the existing air, down to 3 psi, and then refill the tire with nitrogen. This purge/fill cycle is often repeated to achieve the desired level of nitrogen purity (GNI recommends 93.4% in a typical passenger tire) and to remove any moisture in the tire.

Any nitrogen dealer will have the nitrogen generating equipment that produces the nitrogen and a device that purges your tires of the air inside them.


 Are tires covered under warranty by the manufacturer if they have nitrogen in them?

Yes! All major tire companies endorse the use of nitrogen in their products. Tires are still covered under warranty when nitrogen is used as the inflation medium. Using nitrogen has no effect on the manufacturer’s warranty for the tire.

 How does nitrogen affect my Tire Pressure Monitoring System?
Nitrogen and tire pressure monitoring systems are completely compatible. A tire pressure system works exactly the same regardless of whether the tires are filled with air or nitrogen.

Also, nitrogen will not corrode or negatively affect a TPMS in any way. The “Tire Pressure Low” light should not be on if your tires are properly inflated with nitrogen to the manufacturer's recommended psi for your vehicle.


 Do I still need to check my tire pressure if I have nitrogen?

Yes! On average, tires filled with air lose about 1.5 psi every month, whereas tires filled with nitrogen will lose that amount in about 3-4 months. You will likely have to top off your nitrogen filled tires less often than if they were filled with air. However, we still recommend regular checking (monthly or as recommended by your tire manufacturer) because maintaining proper tire pressure is very important for safety reasons, as well as for fuel and tire savings.


 Will my tire pressure fluctuate while driving if I use nitrogen?

You will still see pressure changes with nitrogen while driving, but overall your tires will run cooler and at a more consistent pressure than if they were filled with air. Nitrogen does not contain the moisture and other contaminants found in compressed air, so nitrogen filled tires will fluctuate less in temperature and pressure than air filled tires under driving conditions, even at high speed and at high temps.


 What are the effects of temperature change on my nitrogen filled tires?

The pressure in nitrogen filled tires will change when the temperature changes, just as it does with air filled tires, because nitrogen and oxygen respond to changes in ambient temperature in a similar manner. For example, when your vehicle is parked it will lose a similar amount of pressure for every 10 degree change in temperature, whether the tires are filled with nitrogen or air.

The calculations for this change are based on the Ideal Gas Law. A good rule of thumb is this: For every 10 F degree change in temperature, the pressure will change by 1.9%. If a tire is filled to 32 psi at a temperature of 75 F degrees and the temperature drops 10 degrees, the tire pressure will drop to 31.4 psi; a difference of .6 psi. If a 100 psi tire is filled at 75 F degrees and the temperature drops 10 degrees, the tire pressure will drop to 98.1 psi; a difference of .9 psi.

These fluctuations will occur as the temperature rises and falls no matter what the inflation gas. Fortunately, tire manufacturers are well aware of these conditions and design their tires and recommend their cold inflation pressure accordingly.

However, nitrogen does not contain the moisture and other contaminants found in compressed air so, as you drive and the tires heat up, nitrogen filled tires will fluctuate less in temperature and pressure than air filled tires while driving. The bottom line is, you will still see pressure changes with nitrogen but, overall, your tires will run cooler and at a more consistent pressure than if they were filled with air.

 Can I use nitrogen in the winter?

Yes! Nitrogen's benefits hold true even in extreme winter temperatures: extended tire life, better pressure retention and thus increased fuel economy and improved handling.

Nitrogen responds to changes in ambient temperature in a similar manner to oxygen and thus it stands up to extreme cold temperatures and temperature fluctuations as well as regular compressed air, plus it provides for a more consistent tire pressure while driving.

You will still see pressure changes with nitrogen as the temperature rises and falls, so you will still need to add more pressure during fall and winter (as you would with air-filled tires). But overall nitrogen-filled tires will run cooler and at a more consistent pressure than those filled with air.


 Can nitrogen be used in motorcycle tires?

The benefits of using nitrogen in passenger, light truck and OTR tires have been well-documented. Therefore GNI recommends the use of nitrogen for all tires, including motorcycles, due to its benefits of extended tire life, better pressure retention, and thus improved fuel economy and more reliable handling. Tires should be filled with nitrogen to the same pressure that is recommended by the manufacturer for air.


 I already have 78% nitrogen in my tires. Why do I need more?

It’s not just about adding more nitrogen; it’s about reducing the amount of oxygen and moisture in your tires.

  1. Reducing the oxygen level in your tires from 20% to about 5% is very important.

  •  Oxygen permeates out through your tires 3-4 times faster than nitrogen, resulting in faster pressure loss.
  •  Oxidation occurs when oxygen reacts at high temperatures and pressures like those in a tire. It breaks down the tire's inner liner as it migrates out through the rubber and can damage any metal components including rims, TPMS sensors, valves, and tire repairs.
  •  Oxygen supports combustion, while nitrogen is inert.

  2. Nitrogen inflation eliminates the moisture and contaminants found in compressed air.

  •  Moisture speeds up the oxidation process which can rust steel belts as it permeates out through a tire and cause corrosion around the rim at the tire bead.
  •  Contaminants can clog valve cores and create small leaks.


 I check my tire pressure monthly. Will nitrogen provide any benefit to me?

  Even if you check your pressure monthly, there are still benefits to using nitrogen instead of compressed air:

  •  Nitrogen minimizes moisture: Water vapor, usually found in compressed air, is responsible for significant pressure swings because its volume expands as temperature increases. The result is that nitrogen-filled tires will fluctuate less in temperature and pressure than air-filled tires while driving. Moisture also speeds up the oxidation process which can rust steel belts as it migrates out through a tire and causes corrosion around the rim at the tire bead.
  •  Nitrogen minimizes oxidation: Oxygen breaks down the tire's inner liner as it migrates out through the rubber and it can attack any metal components including rims, TPMS sensors, valves, and tire repairs.

 Nitrogen minimizes contaminants: These can clog valve cores and create small leaks.

Fisher's Tire & Service: Proudly serving Nitrogen Conversion for Tires on Trucks & Autos of customers in the Pensacola, Escambia County, FL, area for over 25 years.

Areas Served : Milton FL | Molino FL | Pensacola FL | and surrounding areas