Specials & Coupons

 

$49.99 Front End Wheel Alignment Special Coupon




$100 Rebate on Monroe Shocks and Struts









Suspension, Struts, Shocks, Steering  & Drivetrain Repair Service | Pensacola, FL

The steering and suspension system is necessary for proper vehicle stability, control, and safe handling. Steering and suspension components, such as ball joints, tie rod ends, control arm bushings, struts and stabilizer links, just to name a few, are constantly subjected to continued stress caused by today’s harsh road conditions. Having these components inspected regularly and replaced as needed assures your vehicle continues to operate safely and reliably.


We Proudly Offer Monroe Struts and Shocks for Truck & Auto Suspension Repair and Steering Repair Services

We Proudly Offer Monroe Struts and Shocks for Truck & Auto Suspension Repair and Steering Repair Services

A Properly aligned steering and suspension system can help deliver a smooth and controlled ride.

Your car or truck's suspension system is an intricate network of parts designed to give you a smooth, stable ride. Since the suspension is where most road abuse occurs, the parts wear out and sometimes break. If your car doesn't seem to ride like it used to, a suspension problem may be the issue.

Monroe Shocks & Struts



Indicators that you need your steering and suspension system inspected include:
  • Pulling to the side
  • Complications steering
  • Issues driving over uneven roads or dips
  • Car continues to bounce after hitting a bump
  • Wheels wander or wiggle
  • Steering seems to be slipping
To help see to it your steering and shocks are working correctly, a professional may check all of your steering and suspension parts, and will also examine:
  • Power steering fluid
  • Rigidity of nuts and bolts
  • Uneven tires or wear
  • Unbalanced tires
  • Torn or used power steering belts
  • Issues with alignment
  • Shocks and/or Struts
  • Steering Wheel Alignment


Our specialists will also inspect your tires and wheel balance to ensure the troubles are not tire-related. At Fisher's Tire & Service, We can take care of all your steering needs.

 

Ball Joint Replacement

The suspension system allows your tires to maintain constant contact with the road, especially on uneven surfaces like bumps and potholes. Ball joints are ball-and-socket joints located between the control arm and the steering knuckle. Ball joints act as the pivot point between the wheels and the rest of the suspension system. They are designed to allow for movement in two planes at once while providing ease of rotation in those planes. They allow a vehicle’s suspension system to move up or down while the wheels turn left or right. Vehicles with shocks have upper and lower ball joints, while many vehicles with struts have only lower ball joints. Some ball joints are load-bearing and will wear faster than normal ball joints. As an important suspension component, ball joints are designed to experience wear and tear, often in the form of friction. Like all suspension system components, ball joints have a maintenance schedule that can help prevent unexpected repairs or replacements.


Inner Tie Rod & Outer Tie Rod Replacement

Regardless of the type of steering system in your vehicle, you use inner and outer tie rods. As an important part of your vehicle’s steering and suspension system, tie rods act as the link between your vehicle’s steering system and the steering arm, which is attached to the steering wheel. When you turn the steering wheel, the steering arm moves the front wheels through the steering system. The inner and outer tie rods connect to the steering arm in order to move the wheels of your vehicle. In the common rack-and-pinion steering system, the inner tie rods connect to the steering rack while the outer tie rods connect to the steering arms. The tie rods make steering and turning possible by moving your wheels in the desired direction. Without properly functioning tie rods, the steering mechanism would no longer operate as intended. Because inner and outer tie rods play such a significant role, replacing tie rods as necessary is important for overall vehicle maintenance.


Shocks Replacement

Shock absorbers are components in your vehicle’s suspension system that help your tires remain in contact with the surface of the road. They dampen the impact of road force and absorb the rebound of springs and other suspension components. Front and rear shocks are designed to adjust to driving conditions, like bumps, potholes, and sudden maneuvers. They also reduce bounce rate, sway, and brake dive or acceleration squat. Modern day shocks are velocity-sensitive, which means that the faster the springs and other suspension components are moving, the more resistance provided by the shocks. Hydraulic shocks convert kinetic energy from the springs into thermal energy that the hydraulic fluid inside each shock absorbs and dissipates. When the suspension system bounces, hydraulic fluid is forced through holes inside the piston. This slows the compression of the piston, thereby slowing down spring and suspension movement. While hydraulic and gas shocks are the most common types of shocks used on vehicles today, some vehicles also use electronic and air shocks.


Struts Replacement

While the function of shocks and struts is very similar, the biggest difference is in how they mount to your vehicle. Shocks function in addition to other suspension components, while struts are designed as a pivot point for the steering mechanism. Struts behave as a dampening device that absorbs excessive bounce. The strut assembly combines coil springs, spring seats, strut bearings, and shock absorbers into one working unit. The steering arm or steering knuckle is also included in some strut designs. Struts use a piston to absorb high lateral loads. The spring seat and strut bearing allow the shock to pivot with the front wheels and the steering mechanism. Struts and accompanying suspension components help push tires back into place when one leaves the road. Overall, struts work in conjunction with the rest of the suspension system to help stabilize the vehicle while maintaining a comfortable and safe ride.

Suspension Inspection

The primary function of your vehicle’s suspension system is to provide structural support while maintaining comfortable riding conditions. The suspension system helps your vehicle’s tires maintain firm contact on the road at all times by compensating for bumps, potholes, and sudden undulations. Suspension system components like coil springs, leaf springs, torsion bars, shocks, and struts all help to absorb bounce, shock, and unexpected motion from the surface of the road. Without a fully functioning suspension system, your vehicle will be harder to control. Because regular wear and tear takes its toll on your suspension system, the scheduling of routine repairs and an understanding of the signs of an impending service are an important part of suspension system maintenance. For example, experiencing unusual movements over bumps or through turns are signs that your suspension system should be inspected by a staff of professionals. When you suspect suspension system problems, please give us a call or contact us.


Sway Bar Link Replacement

Connecting the wheels on opposite sides of the vehicle is a stabilizer bar called the sway bar. The sway bar is charged with controlling “body roll” by distributing the weight of your vehicle to both sides of the suspension. When your vehicle moves through a turn, the sway bar keeps the vehicle level by minimizing body roll through the transfer of vehicle weight to the outside wheels. It also maintains solid contact with the surface of the road through the compression of the suspension components on the inside wheels. Sway bar links are a crucial component in your vehicle’s suspension system. The sway bar links are what connect the suspension to the sway bar and transfer the force of motion from the wheels to the axles. When the vehicle turns or corners, the sway bar end links pull on the bar to resist body roll while stabilizing the force of motion and the weight of the vehicle.


Talk to a Live Technician Now, Schedule an Appointment Online, or Drop in Today for a Quote!


Axle, CV Joint, Driveshaft Repair

Your vehicle’s axle, CV joint, and driveshaft components are integral to the performance and drivability of your vehicle. The driveshaft is a steel or aluminum cylindrical component that connects the transmission to the rear differential. The driveshaft connects to the transmission through the CV joints, which are responsible for transferring the torque from the transmission to the drive wheels at a constant speed. Front wheel drive vehicles use CV joints on the front axles. CV joints allow the axle to bend and change while accommodating the bounce of the wheels. The axle bears the weight of the vehicle while also being strong enough to sustain the forces from braking and accelerating. Over time and through normal use, your vehicle’s axle, CV joint, and driveshaft components may require maintenance or replacement services.

Benefits of Axle, CV Joint, Driveshaft Repair

There are signs to look for when determining when to schedule an inspection of your vehicle’s front axle, rear axle, CV joints, and driveshaft components. Clunking or clicking noises are signs that a CV joint needs replacement. Vibrations during acceleration may indicate a damaged driveshaft, though they may also point to an axle issue depending on the layout of your vehicle. Turning and steering issues may also arise out of a problem with the driveshaft. CV joints can go bad when the grease leaks out of a damaged CV boot. There are various determinants for how quickly your vehicle’s axle, CV joint, and driveshaft components will degrade over time. If you would like to learn more about the intervals between repairs for front wheel drive axles, main driveshafts, CV joints, U-joints, yokes, and other axle assembly components, then contact us today.


CV Axle Inspection

The CV axle is a drive axle located between the drive wheels. Its role is to deliver consistent power to the wheels as they traverse various types of terrain. The CV axle is attached to the wheels by CV joints. The inner CV joints connect the transmission to the CV axle while the outer CV joints connect the CV axle to the wheels. The CV joints connect the CV axle to the wheels, and deliver power while maintaining a constant velocity. The CV axle assembly—the axle shaft, CV joints, and CV boots—is designed to deliver flexible power to the wheels. This means that the axle is able to transmit required levels of torque to the wheels regardless of the angle of the axle. At first, CV axles were commonly used in front-wheel drive vehicles, but today CV axles are also common in rear-wheel drive vehicles.


CV Axle Replacement

CV axles were once primarily used on front-wheel drive vehicles. Today, CV axles are common on both front-wheel and rear-wheel drive vehicles. The CV axle assembly—the axle shaft, CV joints, and CV boots—is designed to flexibly deliver power to the wheels for a seamless transfer of torque. Located between the drive wheels, the CV axle, along with the suspension system, compensates for irregularities in the road and transmits torque to the wheels while keeping them turning at a constant velocity. The CV axle is attached to the wheels by CV joints. The inner CV joints connect the transmission to the CV axle while the outer CV joints connect the CV axle to the wheels. A fully functional CV axle assembly provides your vehicle with safety and stability while supporting passenger comfort through various speeds and driving conditions.


CV Joint Replacement

Your vehicle’s CV joints connect to the drive axles, which connect the transmission to the wheels. The inner CV joint connects the transmission to the axle, and the outer joint connects the axle to the wheels. Because the CV joint links two rotating shafts in a fixed position, it must allow for a range of motion to compensate for road force while keeping the two shafts connected. The CV joint is responsible for transmitting consistent torque to the wheels regardless of the angle of the axle or shaft. The CV joints move with the suspension system to help the wheels maintain a constant velocity through various road forces like bumps and potholes. The CV joint is designed like a ball and socket joint and uses steel balls to move a larger ball enclosed by steel. A CV boot covers the CV joint and helps ensure proper lubrication. CV joints allow for a range of motion while keeping your vehicle’s wheels moving at the same speeds over all types of surfaces.


Driveshaft Balance

The driveshaft, which is located between your vehicle’s differentials, is responsible for transferring torque and rotation to the drive wheels and other drivetrain components. The driveshaft is tubular with an outer metal housing and an inner metal cylinder that spins at a rotational force determined by engine output. Essentially, the driveshaft tells the wheels to switch from idle to drive. Designed to endure sheer stress and torsion, driveshafts apply forces of motion without adding additional weight or stress to other drivetrain components. Driveshaft components like CV joints, U-joints, and yokes accommodate axial movement and allow for variation in driveline angles and distances between components. Like tires, your driveshaft should be balanced to promote safe operation and prevent failure. We invite you to give us a call or visit when you’re ready to balance your driveshaft.


U-Joint Replacement

Universal joints, often referred to as u-joints, are flexible couplings that serve an important role on your vehicle. One of the primary duties of a u-joint is to transmit the rotational force between the transmission, the driveshaft, and the differentials, which are responsible for turning your vehicle’s drive wheels. As a critical linking component, a u-joint should be flexible enough to compensate for angle and alignment changes between the driveshaft and differentials. U-joints consist of four legs, or trunnions, that extend from the center cross, or body. The legs are covered with bearing caps and are housed within the yoke, which is designed to pivot and spin as they rotate with the driveshaft. Although many original equipment u-joints are sealed, some aftermarket u-joints are greasable and should be lubricated periodically. Understanding the type of u-joints on your vehicle will help you determine the proper maintenance intervals and decide when a u-joint should be replaced.


Yoke Replacement

Driveshaft yokes are located on the ends of the driveshaft. In most configurations, one yoke connects to the rear of the vehicle while the other yoke reaches into the transmission. The driveshaft sends power from the transmission and turns the differential, which moves the wheels. These connecting components help transfer your vehicle’s rotational energy from the transmission to the moving wheels. Many driveshafts are designed with a slip yoke at one end and an end yoke at the other end. The slip yoke allows for the length of the driveshaft to change with the motion of the suspension system as it reacts to the forces of the road. At the same time, the u-joints allow for changes in angle between the differential and the transmission. These components are designed to be flexible in order to maintain constant speeds and rotational forces between elements of your vehicle’s axle assembly.


Talk to a Live Technician Now, Schedule an Appointment Online, or Drop in Today for a Quote!


Fisher's Tire & Service: Proudly serving the Truck and Auto Suspension System & Drivetrain Repair needs of customers in the Pensacola, Escambia County, FL, area for over 25 years.

Areas Served : Milton FL | Molino FL | Pensacola FL | and surrounding areas